Review paper published in the Journal of Cancer Metastasis and Treatment

My first ‘single author paper’, “Central Regulation of Breast Cancer Growth & Metastasis” was just published in the Journal of Cancer Metastasis and Treatment. This was very exciting to put together as it was another excuse to write a lot about a topic that I love. In this review, I present some of the exciting research that aims to uncover how the brain interacts with the body to facilitate cancer growth.

Examples of neural circuits that play an important role in cancer-associated systemic disruption (e.g., circadian rhythm and sleep abnormalities, systemic inflammation, and anorexia/cachexia).

Examples of neural circuits that play an important role in cancer-associated systemic disruption (e.g., circadian rhythm and sleep abnormalities, systemic inflammation, and anorexia/cachexia).

Paper accepted at the Journal of Physiology!

Our paper “The Role of PHOX2B-derived Astrocytes in Chemosensory Control of Breathing and Sleep Homeostasis” has been accepted for publication in at the Journal of Physiology!

This research was led by Drs. Catherine Czeisler and Jose Otero at The Ohio State University.

I’m happy to have been a part of this large and multi-team effort! Congrats to all!

PHOX2B-derived brainstem astrocytes contribute to chemosensory control of breathing and sleep homeostasis.

PHOX2B-derived brainstem astrocytes contribute to chemosensory control of breathing and sleep homeostasis.

Received Innovator Grant!

We were awarded a Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Innovator Grant for our project proposal “Linking the brain to immunity via Deep Brain Stimulation and Mass Cytometry”!

The experiments described in this proposal will use deep brain stimulation in human patients to investigate how modulating the activity of different brain areas influences the immune system.

I am extremely excited to start on this project, which will shed new light onto brain control of immunity.

Experimental workflow for examining brain-immune interactions using DBS and mass cytometry (Credit: JCB).

Experimental workflow for examining brain-immune interactions using DBS and mass cytometry (Credit: JCB).


Received WC Young Recent Graduate Award!

I have been notified that I received the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology (SBN) WC Young Recent Graduate Award for my dissertation research! I am very humbled to have been selected by the society for this award. I will be honored at the Society for Neuroscience next week.

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William C. Young was one of the founders of modern behavioral neuroendocrinology. The SBN honors WC Young through the "WC Young Recent Graduate Award" (initially created in the 1960's by one of the society's predecessors, the West Coast Sex Conference). Selection criteria for the WC Young Recent Graduate Award are based on the doctoral dissertation, scholarly productivity, and letters of reference.

Selection as an official #SfN2018 meeting blogger

I have been selected as an official blogger by the Society for Neuroscience to write posts covering the annual neuroscience meeting in San Diego on November 3-7th 2018!

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If you’re on this website, you already likely follow me on twitter, but in case you don’t, please do (@Jborniger) to receive updates during and following this conference on the latest and greatest science around!!

NIH BRAIN Initiative F32 is funded!

My F32 application was funded by the NIH on it's first submission! This guarantees me 3 years of funding to study what I love! This project focuses on the interplay between the lateral hypothalamus and ventral tegmental area in learning and memory and sleep.

Funded Grant Available in Resources.

Sponsors: Luis de Lecea and Jin Hyung Lee

See details on NIH Reporter Here

Schematic sagittal section showing hypocretin projections to arousal centers (LC/VTA). These downstream regions innervate areas important for learning and memory (i.e., hippocampus, mPFC…) (credit: JCB).

Schematic sagittal section showing hypocretin projections to arousal centers (LC/VTA). These downstream regions innervate areas important for learning and memory (i.e., hippocampus, mPFC…) (credit: JCB).